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The Best Key Lime Pie Ever (Paleo and Elimination Diet Friendly)

Whether you are following a special food plan, or just love dessert, you’ve got to try this Key Lime Pie recipe. It suits all kinds of diets — Paleo! Gluten-free! Dairy-free! Egg-free! And it’s chock full of gut healthy ingredients, including my magic ingredient: avocado!

If you’ve never used avocado in baking, it’s creamy, and picks up the flavors of your ingredients. And here’s the magic: It doesn’t taste like avocado. Not even a little bit. Once you try this Key Lime Pie recipe, it will become one of your go-to desserts.

The Best Key Lime Pie Ever

One of my all time favorites!

For crust:

1 cup unsweetened, shredded coconut

1 cup raw walnuts

¼ teaspoon sea salt

6 medjool dates, pitted

For filling:

1 ½ cups avocado (approximately 3)

2/3 cup freshly squeezed lime juice (~2 limes)

¾ cup raw honey

1/8 teaspoon sea salt

½ cup virgin coconut oil, melted

Zest of one lime

Fresh raspberries (optional)

 

Instructions:

For crust:

1)    To a food processor with an S blade, add coconut, walnuts and salt. Blend until finely ground.

2)    Add dates and mix until mixture combines but do not over process.

3)    Press mixture into the bottom of a 9-inch pie plate, set aside.

For the filling:

4)    In a food processor, add avocado, lime juice, honey and salt and blend.

5)    Add coconut oil and process until mixture is smooth.

6)    Spoon mixture into pie plate evenly and refrigerate for 2 hours.

Garnish with fresh raspberries if desired and serve cold.

 

Keri Lynn MacElhinney, RD, CDN is a Functional Medicine Nutritionist at Blum Center for Health.  She has over 20 years of professional experience as a Registered Dietitian and holds a nutrition license in New York and the State of Connecticut. In her early years, her field experience covered a wide array of areas including acute care hospitals, community health centers, substance abuse.  Make an appointment with Keri Lynn at 914-652-7800.

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In Defense of Grains

If you’re reading this, you’ve likely been tuned into the integrative/functional health community for some time. And if you’ve suffered from an autoimmune condition, perhaps you’ve tried a Paleo (aka ancestral) or AIP (autoimmune protocol) diet, both of which eschew grains (and other whole foods).

Years before the popularity of these diets peaked, we’d been hit hard with the “low carb” craze. Carbohydrates come in many forms (grains, legumes, fruits, vegetables), but grains have gotten a particularly bad rap, primarily because a diet heavy in processed grains (flour-based products like conventional bread, crackers, muffins, etc.) can be kryptonite for blood sugar and inflammation management.

Indeed, for some, grains can cause brain fog, bloating, and digestive upset. I get it. But my feeling is that for many, the preexisting digestive imbalance is the reason for the intolerance, not the other way around. Until digestive function is optimized, many foods—not just whole grains—can cause issues.

I agree that, for some people, going grain-free can be helpful for managing autoimmunity. But I don’t believe that whole, gluten-free grains are categorically bad for everyone—even those looking to reverse their autoimmune condition.

Speaking of gluten, I do believe that it should be avoided, especially during a healing/immune modulatory phase. Gluten-containing grains include wheat (einkorn, durum, faro, graham, kamut, semolina, spelt), barley, rye, and triticale. Gluten-free grains include quinoa, amaranth, millet, teff, buckwheat, and various types of rice.

The case against grains is that they contain the anti-nutrients phytic acid and lectin, along with enzyme-inhibitors that inhibit mineral absorption. Yet these “anti-nutrients” are also found in vegetables like beets and dark leafy greens. Should we avoid these nutrient-rich foods too?

Grains are naturally high in vitamins and minerals (B vitamins, iron, manganese, magnesium, and zinc, to name a few) and the key is to properly prepare them to release these nutrients. See below for more information.

It’s only in the past century or so that we’ve largely stepped away from the traditional practices of leavening/fermentation, soaking, and sprouting (germinating), which “pre-digests” grains. Additionally, Vitamin A inhibits the potentially negative effects of phytic acid.

When traditionally prepared, grains are much easier to digest, we’re able to absorb their nutrition, and they help us produce serotonin, a neurotransmitter that brings about a sense of comfort and calm, which in itself is enough to consider whether grains should be avoided. In my work with “low carb refugees,” once these clients begin adding some complex carbs from whole grains (and other foods, especially starchy vegetables) back into their diets, the overall feedback is that they feel so much calmer and more grounded and centered. And they start sleeping better.

Dr. Susan Blum mentions quinoa, amaranth, millet, teff, buckwheat, various types of rice, and legumes in her book, The Immune System Recovery Plan, and incorporates these foods in several of her recipes. She calls them “foods to include.”

While being grain-free may be part and parcel of some of the popular diets today, it doesn’t mean it’s helpful or warranted for everyone. Moderate grain intake simply offers too many benefits—vitamins, minerals, and fiber and…calm and comfort in the form of serotonin production. So next time you’re inclined to take a “chill pill,” maybe reach for some millet instead.

The guide below was written by Lisa Markley, MS, RDN, and co-author of The Essential Thyroid Cookbook.

Purchasing
When purchasing whole grains, select intact gluten-free grains, such as brown rice, quinoa, certified gluten-free whole oat groats, steel cut or rolled oats, buckwheat, millet, and amaranth. When possible, opt for these grains in their sprouted form; your store may carry some sprouted whole grain options such as brown rice, oats, and quinoa in the aisle where you’d find other packaged grains. According to the Whole Grains Council, sprouting increases the grain’s antioxidant activity as well as many of the grains’ key nutrients, such as B vitamins, Vitamin C, folate, fiber, and essential amino acids, such as lysine. You can cook dried sprouted grains the same way you would regular grains, but follow the package for specific instructions, as cooking time may be less in some instances.

Rinsing
Certain grains should be rinsed before cooking to remove dust or other debris and to yield the best flavor. These include millet, quinoa, and rice. Quinoa has a bitter coating on the outside called saponin that will negatively impact flavor if not rinsed. Rinse the grains by placing in a fine mesh strainer and rinsing with warm water.

Soaking
If you’re unable to purchase sprouted grains, it’s generally recommended to pre-soak grains to enhance digestibility and break down phytic acid.  With the exception of quick-cooking grains like quinoa, millet, amaranth and teff, soak in their measured amount of water in a glass measuring cup for 12-24 hours on your kitchen counter. Add 1 tablespoon of raw apple cider vinegar or lemon juice per 1 cup of liquid, if desired. When ready to cook, note the water level of the soaked grain, drain off the soaking water, add fresh water to the measure you noted, and simmer on stove with a pinch of salt for recommended cooking time (see “Cooking” below). Note that soaking some grains reduces their overall cooking time by a few minutes, but the cooking time for pre-soaked steel cut or rolled oats is reduced by about half.

Sprouting
If you’d like to try your hand at sprouting your own grains, it’s fairly simple:

  1. Measure approximately ½ cup of an intact, unmilled whole grain such as brown rice, forbidden black rice, quinoa, millet, or certified gluten-free oat groats, place in a bowl, and cover with water. Soak the grains for 8-12 hours.
  2. Drain and rinse thoroughly, then place soaked grains in the bottom of a quart-sized mason jar. Cover jar with cheesecloth and hold in place with a rubber band or the metal ring from a screw lid. They also sell special sprouting lids/screens that are handy for this.
  3. Invert jar over a bowl and keep at room temperature, but out of direct sun.
  4. Rinse and strain grains thoroughly twice daily, then re-invert over bowl.
  5. Repeat step 6 every day for 1 to 5 days. You’ll know the grains have sprouted once a tail appears. You can continue sprouting/germination until tail is the length of the original grain.
  6. Enjoy them fresh, sprinkled on salads. Store the sprouted grains in the refrigerator for up to 3 days. Discard them if they begin to smell off or become slimy.
  7. The sprouted grains can also be dried by spreading evenly on a sheet pan and placing in at oven set to 150-200 for 8-12 hours. Or use a dehydrator, if you have one. Once the grains are dried thoroughly, you can store or cook as you would normal dried grains. They can also be ground into flour and used in baking.

Cooking
Place measured grain with water or stock and a pinch of sea salt in a pot, cover with a tight fitting lid, and bring to a boil. A 1-quart pot is best for cooking 1 cup of grain, a 2-quart pot for 2 cups of grain, and so on. Reduce heat and simmer for suggested cooking time, which will vary depending on grain. (See “Soaking” above about the reduction in cooking time for soaked grains.) Refrain from stirring the pot while the grains are cooking; this will disrupt the steam pockets that allow the top layer to cook as evenly as the bottom and cause some not to fully cook. To check if all of the water has been absorbed, simply tilt the pot to the side to see if there’s still water pooling at the bottom; if water is still present, continue to cook for a few additional minutes until it has all been absorbed.

Jill Grunewald, HNC, FMCHC, is the founder of Healthful Elements, an alopecia expert, and best selling author of The Essential Thyroid Cookbook.

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How to Navigate the Elimination Diet During the Holidays

Tis the season to be jolly! A time to embrace all the fun, laughter, family, friends and warmth around you.

Along with this wonderful socialization comes FOOD! A common question I am asked is, “How can I stay on the elimination diet plan during the holidays?” Let’s navigate this together!

You started an elimination diet to help you understand what food may be contributing to your symptoms. You are into the second week and you are feeling the best you have felt in a long time! You have a holiday party to attend and want to stay as compliant as possible. Otherwise, if you reintroduce foods at the party, how will you know which one of those foods provokes those terrible symptoms again?

When you are not feeling well, an elimination diet plan can be the single most important thing you can do to bring yourself relief from the symptoms you experience. It’s common to hear my clients tell me that they can’t believe the foods they eat daily cause their body so much distress.

At the Blum Center For Health, we guide you through an elimination diet known as the Leaky Gut Diet.  We remove the most common food sensitivities such as gluten, dairy, soy, corn, eggs, shellfish, peanuts, caffeine, and alcohol. These meal plans are further customized to meet individual nutritional needs as needed. These target foods are carefully reintroduced at a later date to test for tolerance. This is a perfect time to adapt to an anti-inflammatory eating plan by removing processed foods and sugars while determining possible food sensitivities that may be causing inflammation in the body. Once you complete the Elimination Diet, you are equipped with your own nutritional plan. Talk about power!

I did my first elimination diet years ago. I chose the month of December! It was the best decision I ever made. I suffered with daily bloating and chronic migraines. I had a great time trying new foods and recipes. While on the elimination diet, I ate without feeling bloated, my energy was optimal, and I was finally free from my headaches! I also lost a few pounds as a bonus! I encourage you to go for it and pick out your favorite holiday outfit!

5 Ways to Navigate the Holidays While on an Elimination Diet

Bring your own dish.

You have a food sensitivity and not sure what will be on the menu… play it safe and bring a dish. This will allow you a greater peace of mind so you can eat and socialize without being sorry about what food sensitivities could be lurking within the food around you. Besides, people will think you were so kind to contribute to the spread!

Don’t go to the event hungry.

Eat your regular meals so you don’t go to the feast ready to indulge.  This will help you prevent eating something you really wanted to avoid because to you were too hungry to resist. Stay hydrated. Sometimes we can mistake hunger for thirst.

Don’t be afraid to say, “No, thank you.”

I come from an Italian background and I know too well how a Grandparent could be offended if you say “no” to a food she is offering. My Grandmother used to say, “I didn’t see you eat this”, and would gracefully put a large portion on my plate. Always be polite and say it looks delicious, but no thank you. Recall how you felt before you started the elimination diet — it’s not worth setting yourself back. Know when you can practice the 90/10 rule with eating. For example, histamine sensitivity is all about threshold. You consume lemon in your seltzer and you’re fine but when coupled with a meal containing fermented vegetables and shellfish…you just ruined your evening!

You are not strange!

This is the generation of special diet modifications … gluten-free, nightshade-free, Paleo, low FODMAPs etc. People are more familiar with food sensitivities. Heck, they probably have tried a gluten-free or dairy-free meal plan themselves. Contact the cook or the person in charge of the menu. Nine times out of ten they have an alternative they can offer you.

Embrace how good you are feeling.

Live in the moment and let go of the stress. Embrace the joy the holidays can bring to you. You will be avoiding alcohol on your elimination diet. No problem, opt for a refreshing seltzer with lime.  Be creative with your food choices and make your own appetizers. Like popcorn, make your own version of a cauliflower popcorn. Use a head of cauliflower, cut into large bite size pieces and toss in avocado oil, sea salt and turmeric. Roast in a 425 degree oven until golden to your liking. Enjoy!

Above all be mindful of the food you are eating being grateful while savoring each bite!

Want to have your Best December Ever? Check out Health Coach Melissa Rapoport’s, terrific post this month about a December mindset vs. a Holiday mindset. Having a plan as you navigate through the holiday months will prove to reduce stress and the risk of unwanted guilt of feeling like your health spiraled out of control. → Show Me

Are you feeling the effects of too much holiday fun? About now many people feel heavy, bloated and blah. It’s the perfect time to do our 10-Day HealMyGut program — reboot and feel better —  it’s exactly what you need to bring your intestinal flora back into balance. Relief is on the way! — Yes, Please!

Keri Lynn MacElhinney, RD, CDN is a Functional Medicine Nutritionist at Blum Center for Health.  She has over 20 years of professional experience as a Registered Dietitian and holds a nutrition license in New York and the State of Connecticut. In her early years, her field experience covered a wide array of areas including acute care hospitals, community health centers, substance abuse.  Make an appointment with Keri Lynn at 914-652-7800.

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Can Food Be Making You Sick?

It seems that no matter what the event these days, there is food criteria to attend to. From your child’s school, to the local restaurant, to friends and family, food sensitivities are knocking on your door. Food sensitivities effect so many people that they can’t be ignored.

The CDC, Center for Disease Control and Prevention, reports, “allergies are the 6th leading cause of chronic illness in the U.S. with an annual cost in excess of $18 billion…50 million Americans suffer from allergies each year”.  According to FARE, Food Allergy Research & Education, food allergy facts and statistics in the United States, there are “more than 170 foods that have been reported to cause reactions in the U.S.”.

PUT A CHECK IN EACH BOX BELOW THAT APPLIES TO YOU:

◊  Depression and/or mood changes

◊ Anxiety

◊ Muscle aches or joint pain

◊ Nasal congestion

 ◊ Constipation and/or diarrhea

 ◊ Acid reflux/indigestion

 ◊ Bloating or gas

 ◊ Dark circles or bags under your eyes

◊  Headaches

 ◊ Rashes or skin dryness/itchiness

 ◊ Fatigue

 ◊ Unintentional weight gain

Did you check one or more of the symptom boxes above?

You could be suffering from food sensitivities.

ARE YOU SUFFERING FROM FOOD INDUCED INFLAMMATION?

Do you feel like your weight fluctuates or you just can not get rid of the those unwanted pounds. Do you feel like you have done it all and you just can’t lose the weight? This can be truly frustrating indeed!

Food sensitives cause inflammation in the body. This Inflammation increases our risk of developing disease, ultimately obesity.

Although we hear food allergies and food sensitivities interchangeably, they do differ. How do we know which one we are suffering from?

There two types of food mediated reactions, immune mediated and non-immune mediated

Immune Mediated:

  • Food Allergies

Non-immune mediated:

  • Food Sensitivities
  • Food Intolerances

Food allergies are known as IgE, immunoglobulin E, mediated type 1 hypersensitivity reactions and are generally immediate in response. These bodily reactions can range in severe such as hives to more critical in response such as anaphylaxis and can be fatal. Some of the most common allergy foods include tree nuts, peanuts, eggs, fish and shellfish, milk, gluten, and soy. Foods that we are allergic to must be avoided and can not even be consumed in even small quantities.

Food intolerances are non-immune related and are a result of a metabolic reactions such as a lack of an enzyme to digest the foods such as lactase. When this happens, they are considered intolerant and will no longer be able to digest dairy foods.

Food sensitivities are delayed in onset, up to 72 hours or more, and are non-immune mediated reactions and are a result of an ingested food. Food sensitivities maybe present as any of the following conditions:

  • Crohn’s disease
  • GERD
  • Irritable bowel disease/diarrhea/constipation
  • Migraines
  • Ulcerative colitis
  • Fibromyalgia
  • Eosinophilic esophagitis
  • Arthritis
  • Attention deficit disorder
  • Eczema

Food sensitivities can be the body’s response to a chemical naturally occurring in a food such as solanine, histamine, and salicylates. These reactions many times are dose related and sometimes can be consumed in small amounts but when a threshold is reached, a reaction occurs. Each person’s threshold will be different and some people may need to remove this these foods from their diet to become asymptomatic.

4 COMMON CAUSES FOR FOOD SENSITIVITIES 

  • Leaky gut! When our intestinal barriers break down from bad bacteria, parasites or infections passing through, this is considered leaky gut. When this happens, our immune system becomes compromised and food particles can enter the circularity system and create systemic inflammation. Sometimes these foods that cause our body havoc and can be difficult to assess because these reactions are often delayed. Food sensitivity testing can be done to help us get a baseline for what these foods may be. Elimination diets are implemented to remove those foods for generally 6-8 weeks to essentially calm or better yet reduce the inflammatory response.
  • Chronic antibiotic use. The use of antibiotics sometimes can’t be avoided, but this can compromise the immune system. Antibiotics kill off the bad bacteria it was intended to but also do a number on the good bacteria that keep the ecosystem in balance.
  • Chronic stress and toxic exposure. Every day we breath in air, drink water, and eat food that have chemicals and pesticides that our liver has to work overtime to filter out. This insult can result in toxic overload causing us to feel fatigue and run down. This can impact our immune systems negatively making our bodies even more susceptible to food sensitivities.
  • Too much of one food. Ever think about how many times you eat the same food in one day? Let’s look at a scenario that can be commonly seen in many diets.

EGGS! Breakfast time, you eat 2 eggs over easy over paleo bread (made with egg whites) and butter with a piece of fruit. Lunch time, Chicken cranberry walnut salad made with mayonnaise (this contains egg), over bib lettuce. Snack: RX bar (contains egg). Dinner meal consists of veal parmesan (breaded and dipped in egg) with green beans. Sometimes we can eat a particular food in a small quantity but when we are exposed to it multiple times in one day we can hit our threshold. In this case, it would have been 5 times in one day!

CAN DIET REALLY MAKE AN IMPACT ON OUR HEALTH AND SIGNIFICANTLY IMPACT OUR DAY TO DAY SYMPTOMS?

Yes, changing your diet can be life altering!

5 COMMON FOOD SENSITIVITIES FOR YOU TO CONSIDER

  • Histamines. The most common symptoms of histamine sensitivity include itching and headaches. Foods to consider reducing or eliminating from your diet plan include aged cheese and meats, citrus, spinach, bananas, and fermented foods and many spices too!
  • Solanine. A common symptom of solanine sensitivity is muscle and joint pain. I find that this is one of the hardest groups to decrease because it contains tomatoes and potatoes, in other words, tomato sauce and french fries!! Other solanine rich foods include eggplant, goji berries, and peppers.
  • Sulfites. Common symptoms of sulfite sensitivity include difficulty breathing or wheezing, loose stool or trouble swallowing. Sulfites can be found naturally in food or added as a preservative. Foods that contain sulfites include dried fruits, shellfish and crustaceans, cruciferous vegetables such as broccoli, cabbage Brussels sprouts, premade packaged foods such as instant potatoes and doughs, and malt beverages and wines.
  • Soy. Soy sensitivity can manifest itself in different ways in each person. Some symptom may include flushing, lip swelling, loose stool or abdominal cramping. Soy is found soybeans, bean curd, edamame, miso, natto, soy sauce, soy milk, many vegan products and additives such as TVP (textured vegetable protein).
  • Gluten. Common symptoms of gluten sensitivity may include brain fog, rash, loose stool, and bloating. Gluten can be found in breads, cereals, premade packaged foods, veggie burgers, breaded meats and meatballs, malted products, make ups and

Rather than guessing what these offending foods are, we can get this information from food sensitivity testing.

The FIT test (Food Inflammation Test) measures 132 foods, colorings and additives that can result in delayed food sensitivity. The FIT test is unique in that it measures IgG antibodies along with complement that is produced from immune complexes as a result of food that crosses through the intestinal lining. It is also a great way to understand if you have a leaky gut and if it’s causing food sensitivities.  Learn more here.

As a Nutritionist, I knew a lot about food but removing my food sensitivities was a true eye opener for me and one of the largest positive impacts I made on my health and well-being.

 

 

Keri Lynn MacElhinney, RD, CDN, CLT, IFNCP is a Functional Medicine Nutritionist at Blum Center for Health.  She has over 20 years of professional experience as a Registered Dietitian and holds a nutrition license in New York and the State of Connecticut. In her early years, her field experience covered a wide array of areas including acute care hospitals, community health centers, substance abuse.  Make an appointment with Keri Lynn at 914-652-7800.

 

 

 

 

 

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One of Our Favorite Detox Recipes

In cultures all over the world the advent of Spring signals rebirth — the grass and trees turns green, a burst of color transform the landscape and the earth starts to give us Spring produce. Hooray!

It also signals Spring cleaning — our homes and our bodies. Here at the Blum Center we are all about detoxing our bodies in Spring to rid ourselves of the Winter heaviness, and to reduce the toxic load we carry from the food we eat, the water we drink and the air we breath — not to mention all the chemicals used in our homes and in our cosmetics. It’s cathartic and a powerful way to celebrate the reemergence of life, and longer, warmer days.

In fact, you can join us to Detox! Our 14-Day Whole Life Group Coaching Program begins Tuesday, May 28th at 8pm. Sign Up Now

In the meantime, try out this delicious and easy detox recipe developed in the Blum Kitchen. We love using both red and yellow beets — it adds such beautiful color to the dish.

Roasted Beet, Walnut & Baby Kale Salad with Apple Cider Vinaigrette

Serves 6

Ingredients:

  • 4 medium-sized red and/or yellow beets, quartered  
  • ½ cup toasted walnuts
  • 1 tsp fresh thyme leaves
  • 2 Tbsp extra virgin olive oil  
  • 8 cups organic baby kale OR one plastic pre-packaged container (a baby kale and greens blend is fine). Bonus: for those short on time the prepared blend are usually pre-washed!
  • Salt and pepper to taste

Directions:

  1. Preheat oven to 375 degrees  
  2. In a medium-sized mixing bowl combine prepared beets, olive oil, salt, pepper and thyme leaves. Place on a cookie sheet and place in preheated oven.
  3. Bake for 30 minutes or until beets are fork tender. Remove beets from cookie sheet and let cool.
  4. Toast walnuts on another cookie sheet in the same oven for 7 minutes. Remove and let cool.
  5. While the beets and walnuts are cooling, prepare the Apple Cider Vinaigrette, below
  6. Place salad greens in large bowl, top with beets, and dress with Apple Cider Vinaigrette, to taste.
  7. Enjoy!

Apple cider vinaigrette:

Makes about 1 cup

Ingredients:

  • 1/3 cup extra virgin olive oil
  • 2 tsp fresh lemon juice
  • 2 Tbsp honey
  • 1 small clove of garlic, minced
  • 1 Tbsp Dijon Mustard
  • ¼ cup raw apple cider vinegar
  • Salt and pepper to taste

Directions:

  1. Place all ingredients in a blender and blend until smooth.
  2. Serve over your favorite salad.

Meet Melissa: Melissa Rapoport is the Manager of Health Coaching and Lifestyle Programming at Blum Center for Health in Rye Brook, NY. She combines her graduate work in Developmental Psychology with her education in nutrition, health and coaching to create highly individualized programs that result in lifetime change. A contributing author to three international bestselling books, Melissa’s greatest joy is her relationship with her two daughters.

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Gluten Free Banana Oat Muffins

If you’re on an elimination diet, these delicious muffins are great for breakfast or an easy on-the-go snack!  I tested these muffins at home and the whole family enjoyed them – no one knew the gluten, egg, or dairy was missing!
If you make these, let me know how they came out.  ENJOY!

Banana Oat Muffins:  Gluten free, Dairy free, Egg Free

Ingredients:

1 tbsp ground flaxseed

3 tbsp water

¼ cup almond butter

2 ripe medium bananas

2 tbsp raw honey

¾ cup gluten free rolled oats

1 tsp baking soda

½ tsp ground cinnamon

 

Directions:

Preheat oven to 375 degrees. With an oil spray, grease a 9 cup muffin tin.

In a small bowl, mix flaxseed and water and set aside.

Add remaining ingredients to a blender and blend until smooth.

Add flaxseed mixture until combined.

Pour batter into each muffin pan equally, about 2/3 full to each cup.

Bake for approximately 15 minutes and cool before removing from the muffin tin.

 

Yields: 9 muffins

 

Keri Lynn MacElhinney, RD, CDN, CLT, IFNCP is a Functional Medicine Nutritionist at Blum Center for Health.  She has over 20 years of professional experience as a Registered Dietitian and holds a nutrition license in New York and the State of Connecticut. In her early years, her field experience covered a wide array of areas including acute care hospitals, community health centers, substance abuse.  Make an appointment with Keri Lynn at 914-652-7800.

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Your Microbiome: Caring For What’s Inside You

Microflora

There are literally trillions of bacteria in our digestive tracts.  They make up what is called the microflora, because under a microscope they look like little (micro) flowers (flora).  We refer to it collectively as our microbiome and they play an unbelievable role in synthesizing vitamins, producing natural antibiotics and degrading and eliminating toxins.  There are more of them in our bodies than human cells.

Think about it, we are walking around harboring and supporting this microbiome, an entire ecosystem within us.

Recent science has taught us that the microbiome also dictates aspects of who we are – our personalities, what diseases we will get, our mood, the size of our girth. Most of us are oblivious to it, we pay no attention to it at all except for to take a probiotic, until it hurts.

Internally we are 98.6 degrees, very moist and we have a tube that runs through us that is 30 feet long that has an opening on each end (the mouth and the anus).   This internal environment is the perfect breeding ground for microbes – both good and bad.

Outside, external, influences often upset the balance.  How we control the external influences determines the delicate balance of good and bad players.  It is up to us – we must care for them, it is critical to good health and requires more than a probiotic.

Factors That Affect the Microbiome:

Stress, the food we eat, genetics, how much time we spend outdoors, if the windows of our homes are open or closed, our exposure to animals, toxin and chemical exposure, antibiotic use throughout our lives, how we were born — C-section or vaginally — whether we were breast-fed, how often we bathe – all affect our microbiome.

For most of us, our guts are a mess.  We have created a microbiome that looks very different from what nature intended for each of us.  So how do we get back to the farm?

Increase These Foods to Support your Microbiome :

  • Eat a rainbow of colorful vegetables and some fruit every day. They will provide fermentable fibers that feed our healthy flora.
  • Include coconut products like coconut oil, milk, yogurt and kefir. Coconut is filled with medium chain triglycerides which feed the cells lining our intestines, and has yeast-killing properties.
  • Include Ghee, which is clarified butter. Ghee is filled with butyrate, a critically-important fatty acid for the care and feeding of cells in our colon.
  • Eat organic, non-GMO These foods are low in pesticides and have not been genetically modified, which can alter your flora and damage you intestinal lining, causing leaky gut.
  • Include healthy anti-inflammatory oils like fish, flax, olive oil.
  • Choose grass-fed, pasture-raised, or free-range organic animals when possible. This will limit the hormones, antibiotics, and pesticides that we are expose our microbes to when eating animals raised in typical feed lots.  Also, the meat from grass fed animals have higher quality, anti-inflammatory fats than corn fed animals.

It is Equally Important to Remove These Foods:

  • Processed food high in sugar, white flour, baked goods, food dyes and preservatives. These foods and chemicals promote the growth of the wrong kind of bacteria in our gut.  Eating this way should be a permanent change.  This includes fruit juices, dried fruit, and all added sugar or artificial sweeteners except stevia.
  • Gluten, dairy, soy, corn, eggs and peanuts because these foods are the most common triggers for reflux, constipation and abdominal discomfort, as well as other non-gut related symptoms.
  • Foods high in histamines: Shellfish, processed or smoked meats and sausages, wine.  Many people are affected by histamine intolerance, caused by the body’s inability to break down histamine in the gut causing crazy allergy reactions. Reactions to histamines can look like allergic reactions, including nasal congestion as well as headaches, dizziness and digestive discomfort.
  • All alcohol

 

Live in our neighborhood? If you’d like to heal your, consider joining my HealMyGut 30-Day Program on Tuesday, April 17th at either 10am or 6pm Blum Center for Health. To learn more or enroll, Click Here.

Don’t live near Blum Center?  Try our online HealMyGut program that includes daily email support, a private Facebook group, and weekly live one-hour coaching calls.

About Mary: Mary Gocke, Director of Nutrition at Blum Center for Health, has been successfully using food and nutrition science to treat and heal people with chronic illnesses and acute conditions for over 25 years. When Mary’s not helping people feel better through nutrition, this mother of two grown children can be found practicing yoga, which she has taught for years, or in her kitchen cooking something colorful.