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For all 4 Steps of The Immune System Recovery Plan, this steeply discounted bundle provides all the supplements that you need to follow the program in Dr. Blum’s book, The Immune System Recovery Plan, and in her online courses and coaching programs.

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Healing Arthritis

Your 3-Step Guide to Conquering Arthritis Naturally

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30-Day HealMyGut Program

Your gateway to feeling well again! End digestive symptoms, repair the immune system, reduce inflammation.

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How to Navigate the Elimination Diet During the Holidays

Tis the season to be jolly! A time to embrace all the fun, laughter, family, friends and warmth around you.

Along with this wonderful socialization comes FOOD! A common question I am asked is, “How can I stay on the elimination diet plan during the holidays?” Let’s navigate this together!

You started an elimination diet to help you understand what food may be contributing to your symptoms. You are into the second week and you are feeling the best you have felt in a long time! You have a holiday party to attend and want to stay as compliant as possible. Otherwise, if you reintroduce foods at the party, how will you know which one of those foods provokes those terrible symptoms again?

When you are not feeling well, an elimination diet plan can be the single most important thing you can do to bring yourself relief from the symptoms you experience. It’s common to hear my clients tell me that they can’t believe the foods they eat daily cause their body so much distress.

At the Blum Center For Health, we guide you through an elimination diet known as the Leaky Gut Diet.  We remove the most common food sensitivities such as gluten, dairy, soy, corn, eggs, shellfish, peanuts, caffeine, and alcohol. These meal plans are further customized to meet individual nutritional needs as needed. These target foods are carefully reintroduced at a later date to test for tolerance. This is a perfect time to adapt to an anti-inflammatory eating plan by removing processed foods and sugars while determining possible food sensitivities that may be causing inflammation in the body. Once you complete the Elimination Diet, you are equipped with your own nutritional plan. Talk about power!

I did my first elimination diet years ago. I chose the month of December! It was the best decision I ever made. I suffered with daily bloating and chronic migraines. I had a great time trying new foods and recipes. While on the elimination diet, I ate without feeling bloated, my energy was optimal, and I was finally free from my headaches! I also lost a few pounds as a bonus! I encourage you to go for it and pick out your favorite holiday outfit!

5 Ways to Navigate the Holidays While on an Elimination Diet

Bring your own dish.

You have a food sensitivity and not sure what will be on the menu… play it safe and bring a dish. This will allow you a greater peace of mind so you can eat and socialize without being sorry about what food sensitivities could be lurking within the food around you. Besides, people will think you were so kind to contribute to the spread!

Don’t go to the event hungry.

Eat your regular meals so you don’t go to the feast ready to indulge.  This will help you prevent eating something you really wanted to avoid because to you were too hungry to resist. Stay hydrated. Sometimes we can mistake hunger for thirst.

Don’t be afraid to say, “No, thank you.”

I come from an Italian background and I know too well how a Grandparent could be offended if you say “no” to a food she is offering. My Grandmother used to say, “I didn’t see you eat this”, and would gracefully put a large portion on my plate. Always be polite and say it looks delicious, but no thank you. Recall how you felt before you started the elimination diet — it’s not worth setting yourself back. Know when you can practice the 90/10 rule with eating. For example, histamine sensitivity is all about threshold. You consume lemon in your seltzer and you’re fine but when coupled with a meal containing fermented vegetables and shellfish…you just ruined your evening!

You are not strange!

This is the generation of special diet modifications … gluten-free, nightshade-free, Paleo, low FODMAPs etc. People are more familiar with food sensitivities. Heck, they probably have tried a gluten-free or dairy-free meal plan themselves. Contact the cook or the person in charge of the menu. Nine times out of ten they have an alternative they can offer you.

Embrace how good you are feeling.

Live in the moment and let go of the stress. Embrace the joy the holidays can bring to you. You will be avoiding alcohol on your elimination diet. No problem, opt for a refreshing seltzer with lime.  Be creative with your food choices and make your own appetizers. Like popcorn, make your own version of a cauliflower popcorn. Use a head of cauliflower, cut into large bite size pieces and toss in avocado oil, sea salt and turmeric. Roast in a 425 degree oven until golden to your liking. Enjoy!

Above all be mindful of the food you are eating being grateful while savoring each bite!

Want to have your Best December Ever? Check out Health Coach Melissa Rapoport’s, terrific post this month about a December mindset vs. a Holiday mindset. Having a plan as you navigate through the holiday months will prove to reduce stress and the risk of unwanted guilt of feeling like your health spiraled out of control. → Show Me

Are you feeling the effects of too much holiday fun? About now many people feel heavy, bloated and blah. It’s the perfect time to do our 10-Day HealMyGut program — reboot and feel better —  it’s exactly what you need to bring your intestinal flora back into balance. Relief is on the way! — Yes, Please!

Keri Lynn MacElhinney, RD, CDN is a Functional Medicine Nutritionist at Blum Center for Health.  She has over 20 years of professional experience as a Registered Dietitian and holds a nutrition license in New York and the State of Connecticut. In her early years, her field experience covered a wide array of areas including acute care hospitals, community health centers, substance abuse.  Make an appointment with Keri Lynn at 914-652-7800.

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Create your Healthiest December Ever!

Here’s a question: Do You Have a “Holiday Mindset” or “December Mindset?”

Here’s what I mean:

  • Do you put everything “on hold” during the holidays and think, “It’s the holidays. Once January 1st hits I’ll get back on track?” That is a “Holiday Mindset.”
  • Or, do you buckle down, stick to your plans and make stuff happen?” That is a “December Mindset.”

Most people, explains Hal Elrod, author of The Miracle Morning, have a “Holiday Mindset” (which puts life on hold and feels kinda crummy).

What does that mean from a health context?

You eat poorly, stop exercising, get caught up in holiday stress, feel overwhelmed and hit January 1st needing to make resolutions and a reboot.

But you can choose to create “The Best December Ever” by staying aware, committed and consciously understanding that everything you do this month sets us you up for success going into the New Year.

Doesn’t that sound awesome? Who doesn’t want success going into the New Year? Why wait for the ball to drop? Why even wait another day?

5 Steps to Creating Your Best December Ever:

1. Create Your Goal — I recommend creating one goal (okay, for you overachievers, you can have two — just be sure it’s something you can stick with for the month of December, one of the most stressful months of the year). It could have to do with food, exercise, self-care, meditation, family, journaling, how you approach the holidays — anything you want, but it has to be something that serves you and will make you feel awesome!

So what do you want to do? Let’s turn it into a “Smart” Goal. Smart Goals are Specific, Measurable, Attainable, Realistic and Timebound.

I’ll use myself as an example. I want to exercise regularly.

My exercise Smart Goal is: I will workout 3x a week, mostly yoga, on Thursday, Saturday and Sunday, for the entire month of December. It is specific, measurable (3x a week), attainable (it’s not out of reach — saying I want to snow ski 3x a week would be unattainable), realistic (saying 5 times a week would be unrealistic for me) and time bound (the month of December).

Your turn! What do you want to create this month?

2.  Write a “Gold Card’ and post where you will see it — basically, this is a love note to yourself. Mine says, “I honor my body and choose to nourish my body. I give myself permission to say “no” to commitments that do not serve me. I will not allow my family/friends to take me off-track. I choose to care for me. Love. Light. Replenish.” I post mine on the bathroom mirror. Yep, seriously. First thing I see in the morning. Last thing I see before I go to bed. It’s hard work to rewire our brains!

3.  Visualize yourself achieving your goal — Performance athletes use visualization to “see themselves” in action. Basically, you’re rehearsing success in your mind’s eye. This is very powerful stuff? Try it … sit quietly and envision yourself achieving your goal. Feels good, right? Add it to your mediation practice if you have one. Or, when you read your Gold Card, take a moment and use visualization.

4.  Get an Accountability Buddy! — ask someone to join you – check in with them by text every day (or every other day). Hint: sometimes it’s best not to choose someone who you know really well. Why? Because you both are more likely to let one another off the hook!)

I started my Best December Ever on Monday (a bit of a head start) for the month. Feels good already.

Your turn! What’s your goal?

Looking to create your best year ever? Now is the time to get started! What do you want to achieve? Lose weight, stick to a food plan or exercise program, start a meditation practice .. I can help. Set up a free consultation and I will help you create your roadmap to success. Call 914-652-7800 and let’s chat!

 

Meet Melissa: Melissa Rapoport is the Manager of Health Coaching and Lifestyle Programming at Blum Center for Health in Rye Brook, NY. She combines her graduate work in Developmental Psychology with her education in nutrition, health and coaching to create highly individualized programs that result in lifetime change. A contributing author to three international bestselling books, Melissa’s greatest joy is her relationship with her two daughters.

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Orange Ginger Mashed Butternut Squash

This comforting recipe is a great change of pace for a healthy, yet flavorful side dish. The citrus adds brightness while warming ginger helps to soothe the digestive tract.

Serves 4

Ingredients

1 butternut squash (approximately 2-2½ pounds), peeled and cut into large chunks

¼ cup pure maple syrup

2 teaspoons orange zest

¼ cup plus 2 tablespoons fresh orange juice

¾ teaspoon fresh lemon juice

1 teaspoon freshly grated ginger

½ teaspoon ground cinnamon

¼ cup coconut butter (manna) or coconut oil

Sea salt, to taste

 

Preparation

  1. Place butternut squash in a large pot. Cover with water and boil for 20 minutes or until tender. Drain thoroughly and set aside.
  2. Combine the maple syrup, orange zest, orange juice, lemon juice, ginger, cinnamon, and coconut butter or oil in a saucepan. Bring the mixture to a quick boil over high heat, being careful not to burn. Quickly lower to a simmer and cook about 2-3 minutes or until syrupy. Remove pan from heat.
  3. Place drained butternut squash in a large bowl and pour orange mixture over the top. Mash together with a potato masher and season with salt. If a creamier texture is desired, transfer mixture to a food processor and pulse until smooth.

 

Cook’s notes: Substitute peeled sweet potatoes for butternut squash, if desired.

 

BIO: Lisa Markley, MS, RDN is a dietitian, culinary nutrition expert, and co-author of the best-selling The Essential Thyroid Cookbook: Over 100 Nourishing Recipes for Thriving with Hypothyroidism and Hashimoto’sAs a seasoned culinary educator and recipe developer, Lisa translates nutrition science to the plate using health-supportive ingredients prepared with peak flavor, seasonality, and nutrient density in mind. Learn more at www.thyroidcookbook.com.

 

Recipe shared with permission from The Essential Thyroid Cookbook by Lisa Markley and Jill Grunewald, published by Blue Wheel Press. Recipes ©2017 by Lisa Markley, MS, RDN. Food photography ©2016 by Kenny Johnson. www.thyroidcookbook.com.

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Oh My! Grain-Free Apple Pie for the Holidays!

A HOLIDAY TRADITION MADE NEW

The holidays are upon us. A perfect time to make new healthy family traditions.

I come from a family that is full of food traditions, especially at holiday time. Being a Dietitian, I have been known to throw my family a few curve balls in the effort to promote good food in the name of HEALTH.   This year our traditional apple pie, made from scratch by my husband has undergone a massive change. It is a grain-free version of an apple pie!

GRAIN-FREE HOMEMADE APPLE PIE

YIELD: ONE  9” PIE                                                     

INGREDIENTS:

3 cups almond flour

1 cup tapioca flour

2 tbsp coconut sugar

½ tsp sea salt

½ cup + 3 tbsp grass fed butter, softened

1 egg

FILLING:

4 medium sized apples, peeled, cored and sliced (I used Gala, Red Delicious, Rome)

2 tbsp tapioca flour

½ cup coconut sugar

2 tsp cinnamon

¼ tsp nutmeg

¼ tsp ginger

1 ½ tsp vanilla extract

INSTRUCTIONS:

1)   Preheat oven to 425 degrees.

2)   In a food processor (my husband does this old school by hand, no food processor allowed), combine first 5 ingredients and pulse until blended into a meal like consistency.

3)   In a separate small bowl, whisk egg and then add to dry mixture. Pulse until dough like consistency (or simply mix with hands!).

4)   Separate into 2 equal portions. Place each portion in between two separate pieces of parchment paper.

5)   Refrigerate dough to make more pliable when rolling (this may not be necessary, my dough rolled out perfect without refrigeration). Using a rolling pin, roll each portion flat.

6)   In a large bowl, place apples, tapioca flour, sugar, spices, and vanilla extract and mix until evenly coated.

7)   Place one layer of crust in the bottom of the pie plate. Pour apple mixture over crust evenly distributing over crust.

8)   Cover pie mixture with top layer of dough. Trim the edges and flute with a fork. May cut a small “x” in the center of pie for venting.

9)   Place pie on a baking sheet in the oven. Bake at 425 degrees for 15 minutes. Reduce temperature to 350 degrees, continue to bake for 40 minutes or until crust is golden brown. If edges become too brown during baking, tent with foil.

10)Remove from oven, cool on a baking rack or top of stove. Cut into equal slices.

Notes: Serve pie topped with coconut whipped cream or non-dairy ice cream.

Recipe tried and tested by my traditional family and passed with flying colors for the holidays. I hope you enjoy it as much as we did!

Keri Lynn MacElhinney, RD, CDN is a Functional Medicine Nutritionist at Blum Center for Health.  She has over 20 years of professional experience as a Registered Dietitian and holds a nutrition license in New York and the State of Connecticut. In her early years, her field experience covered a wide array of areas including acute care hospitals, community health centers, substance abuse.  Make an appointment with Keri Lynn at 914-652-7800.

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When Does a Shoulder Ache Become A Shoulder Problem?

Did you know that shoulder injuries typically occur prior to the progressive aches and pains that follow the injury? The shoulder joint is the most complex joint of the upper body, designed for mobility and physical interaction.

For example, think about opening a jar: although the hand and wrist provides the twisting motion, the shoulder joint provides the greatest amount of strength and stability. In fact, the shoulder’s multidirectional flexibility relies on the ‘rotator cuff muscles’ – four muscles (supraspinatus, infraspinatus, subscapularis, teres minor) inserting around the shoulder joint that help move it, as well as providing stability. However, this architectural complexity creates an inherent risk for shoulder instability and injury, and is a common source of pain

Shoulder Aches and Pains

Most people are unaware of their shoulder problem for a long time. This is why: There are several muscles connected to the shoulder joint. When there is a deficit in one of the muscles, the other muscles have the ability to compensate. Therefore, shoulder injuries do not become apparent as problems until there are multiple deficits causing significant aches and pains.

Another important point to mention is that acute pain felt in the shoulder region may not indicate that there is a primary shoulder problem at all. There are several adjacent musculoskeletal regions (e.g. the neck) that can be painful but appear to be originating from the shoulder. In addition, there some body organs that, when inflamed, can “refer pain” to the shoulder- such as the heart, gallbladder, liver, and lungs. Therefore, a thorough clinical assessment must be made to differentiate whether it is a true shoulder problem, a problem with a nearby musculoskeletal region, or a problem with other internal organs.

The Common Presentation of Shoulder Problems:

  • Non-specific aches and pains in the shoulder area that occurs spontaneously, oftentimes unaware of source or trigger of pain.
  • Loss of range of motion usually in one or two directions (often goes unnoticed)- difficulty with regular activities (reaching for an object, pulling, lifting, holding, etc).
  • Noticeable weakness with activities, inability to lay on the shoulder, swelling, stiffness and difficulty with dressing (e.g. clasping brassiere).
  • If untreated, progresses to multi-directional loss of range of motion and muscle atrophy.
  • Shoulder discomfort with daily activities:
    • Reaching overhead – i.e. opening kitchen cabinet, grabbing an item on a shelf above your head
    • Repetitive motion- i.e.driving, combing hair, brushing teeth,
    • Sustained activities- i.e. pulling, lifting or carrying an item
    • Opening door
    • reaching for seatbelt or an item from the back seat of your car
  • Grinding or cracking sound with shoulder movement
  • Pain or discomfort when laying on the shoulder
  • Difficulty with upper body dressing (ie. clasping brazire)
  • Shoulder discomfort with daily activities, ie driving, carrying grocery, shopping

6 Common Musculoskeletal Shoulder Problems:

  1. Shoulder Arthritis (Glenohumeral Joint Disorder)
  2. Rotator Cuff Syndrome
  3. Frozen Shoulder (Adhesive Capsulitis)
  4. Shoulder Instability
  5. Shoulder Acromioclavicular (AC) Joint Pain

Treatment Options:

Conventional Treatment includes:

  • Ice
  • Anti-inflammatories (oral, topicals, steroid injections)
  • Physical Therapy
  • Surgical Interventions

How Shoulder Problems are Evaluated and Alternative Therapeutic Treatments offered at the Blum Center:

  • Comprehensive Physical Diagnostic Evaluatio
  • Musculoskeletal Ultrasound Diagnostic and Therapeutic Treatment
  • Comprehensive Physical Therapy Program based on diagnostic evaluation
  • Platelet Rich Plasma (PRP)– used to repair the damaged degenerative cartilage, tendons and ligaments
  • Bone Marrow Derived Stem Cells– recommended for more progressive and severe joint issues
  • Prolotherapy– for loose and unstable shoulder ligaments and tendons
    Prolotherapy is routinely the preferred treatment option for chronic shoulder pain/injury. Prolotherapy can be used successfully for treating most chronic injuries of the shoulder including rotator cuff injuries and tears, arthritis, sprains, and AC separation. Prolotherapy is 85-90% successful in stimulating healing of the injured shoulder. Prolotherapy, the injection of a growth promoting solution in injured ligaments and tendons of the shoulder is an effective treatment that decreases pain, increases functional capacity and promotes healing better and in less time than standard treatment with physiotherapy.Remember, shoulder injuries typically occur prior to the progressive aches and pains that follow the injury. The shoulder joint is comprised of a complex system of muscles, tendons, bones, and ligaments that act in a dynamic and flexible way to provide structural support and mobility. Therefore, if you suspect that you’re having progressive shoulder aches or pains, it is highly recommended to seek medical evaluation and treatment if necessary. If so, please call us to make an appointment!

Meet Dr. Aligene: Dr. Kathy Aligene is a Double Boarded Physiatrist and Interventional Pain Management Specialist, and an innovative physician in the field of Integrative Pain and Regenerative Medicine.  Her expertise in these complementing areas of medicine has led her to successfully treat patients with musculoskeletal, joint, spine, pelvic and nerve related problems without depending on chronic use of pain medication. Dr. Aligene treats men and women of all ages and activity levels to support their functional goals and promote an active and healthy lifestyle. Book an appointment with Dr.Aligene by calling 914-652-7800.

  • References
    1. https://www.myvmc.com/symptoms/pain-2/
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Intermittent Fasting and Autoimmunity

Many millennia before fasting became of interest for medical reasons, the practice of fasting — abstaining from all meals — was seen as a way to achieve a higher spiritual purpose.

The main religions often have annual fasts, and some have rites of passage, that include fasting so that one can undergo “purification.” The Hindus and Buddhists do, “atonement” through the Jewish tradition of Yom Kippur or the Catholic tradition of Lent, for clarity of religious purpose or become close to God as the Muslims do for Ramadan. And so on.

It is clear, through the passage of time and tradition, that there is a benefit – spiritual, emotional, and sometimes physical – to the practice of fasting.

Recently, fasting has become vogue but it is stemming from the resurgent scientific literature showing great promise in various fields including cancer therapy, metabolic diseases like diabetes and obesity, and an anti-aging and longevity practice, cardiovascular disease, neurodegenerative disease like Alzheimer’s and dementia and autoimmunity.

The definition of fasting is the abstinence of food, drink or both. The various fasting that science is starting to look at has much more nuance to it than just plain not eating.

The popular 5:2 intermittent fast for weight loss was popularized first in the UK. It features a normal eating schedule 5 days a week and 2 days of the week calories are restricted to about 500.  

The more specific intermittent fast, known as time-restricted feeding, has now been gaining more momentum. With intermittent fasting, you abstain from eating for anywhere from 13-16 hours of the day and keep food consumption during the other hours.

The weight loss that occurs with this approach is supported by studies stemming from Dr. Satchin Panda’s work at the Salk Institute. His research looks at the connection between the time you don’t eat and how it plays into the workings of the circadian rhythm, our internal clocks that can govern metabolism and sleep, for example. Recently, the University of Illinois at Chicago enlisted 23 obese volunteers and had them eat only between 10AM and 6PM. They lost weight and dropped their blood pressure significantly.¹

At the other extreme of fasting are those that abstain from anything aside from water sometimes for a day, but sometimes up to 7-10 days. Other variations include bone broth or vegetable broth fasts often diluted. And there are now low calorie versions of packaged fasts called “fasting mimicking diets” that are essentially 500 cal per day over five days.  

Promising Research on Fasting & Autoimmunity

The only study that looked at the role of fasting on autoimmunity in humans were on people who fasted for Ramadan, the ninth month of the Islamic calendar. Fasting periods are typically around 12-16 hours but there is variation set by the individual. A systemic review did find a mild effect on the immune system but that was transient and returned to baseline once they resumed their regular eating schedule. Lipids improved in some and there was a reduction of oxidative stress markers in others.²

The most persuasive evidence of the benefits of fasting on autoimmunity come from animal studies. Mice that were bred to mimic an autoimmune disease similar to Multiple Sclerosis were used in the study. Multiple sclerosis is a neurodegenerative disorder marked by the demyelination of neurons in the brain that affect nerve conduction. This is in part thought to be due to the body’s own immune system causing the damage.  

The mice were put into 2 groups, one a ketogenic diet (high-fat ultra low-carb) or a fasting mimicking diet (very low calorie and protein) for 3 days every 7 days for a month.

Researchers found was that mice on the fasting mimicking diet had reduced levels of inflammatory cytokines, increase in endogenous corticosteroids and improvements in T cell immunity. Aside from markers they saw that mice actually had REMYELINATION meaning the damaged components of the neurons regenerated what was damaged by the body’s autoimmune process. This was specifically though to happen during the re-feeding periods. Amazingly 20% of the mice had a complete recovery and all mice had a reduction in symptoms.³

This is certainly a very fascinating finding that will spur on further research to elucidate the utility of fasting in certain autoimmune conditions and we’ll hear more as time goes on.

I am big proponent of fasting in certain circumstances and I utilize the full spectrum of fasting methods in the right person. Would I have this discussion on fasting in an autoimmune patient, yes. But given the current data in autoimmunity it is not a methodology that I advocate early on.

Caution: Fasting is something that one can consider exploring on their own if they are not within the extremes of ages, healthy and without any active disease for which they are taking medication but if one does not fit in this category, it is advised that they seek the guidance of a knowledgeable  physician who can advise and monitor them through this process or to be able to assess if they are the right candidate to go through the process.

Do you have a health condition and wondering if fasting is right for you? If you live in our neighborhood, make an appointment with Dr. Yee. Or, if you live afar, consider a Tele-Education call. Send us an email for more information — > Email Now

 

References
  1. https://today.uic.edu/daily-fasting-works-for-weight-loss
  2. https://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pubmed/29230208
  3. https://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pubmed/29230208
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Get a Taste of Fall with Butternut Squash Risotto

Take a stroll through a Farmers Market you will likely come across butternut squash at every turn. Take advantage of this seasonal powerhouse — not only is it comforting and delicious on a brisk Autumn day, it boasts a rich concentration of nutrients, dietary fiber, zinc, protein, folate and potassium.

In fact, beta-carotene, the antioxidant that gives butternut squash its beautiful orange color, along with vitamins A and C, support the natural function of the immune system, helping to prevent infections. Perhaps this is Mother Nature’s way of taking care of us going into cold and flu season!

Here is one of our favorite Fall recipes — creamy, plant-based, with just the right amount of crunch from toasted pumpkin seeds. We’re sure this will become one of your Autumn go-to’s.

 

Fall Butternut Squash Risotto

Serves 4-6

Ingredients:

4 Tbsp. olive oil (divided)

2 cups diced butternut squash (or other winter squash)

1½ cups quartered cremini mushrooms

½ cup diced red onion

1 cup Arborio rice

4-5 cups vegetable stock, warmed in sauce pan

½ tsp. salt

freshly ground black pepper (to taste)

¼ cup toasted pumpkin seeds

¼ cup chopped parsley (garnish)

 

Preheat oven to 375 degrees F. Line two baking sheets with parchment paper.

In a large bowl, combine the diced squash, 1 Tbsp. olive oil, and a pinch of salt. Spread the squash onto one of the baking sheets. Repeat the process with the mushrooms.

Place the trays into the oven to roast for 15-20 minutes (mushrooms) and 25-30 minutes (squash).

Meanwhile, rinse the rice in a fine mesh strainer under cold water. Drain well.

Heat 1 Tbsp. olive oil in a heavy-bottomed pot over medium heat. Add the onion and sauté for 5-6 minutes, or until translucent. Add the rice and stir to coat, cooking for one minute longer.

Add one cup of the warm stock and a pinch of salt, stirring constantly until the grain has absorbed all of the liquid. Continue to add the stock in ½ cup increments until the rice is cooked through and the grains are creamy.

Stir in the cooked squash and mushrooms. Season to taste with additional salt and pepper, as desired.

Garnish with pumpkin seeds and parsley, and serve warm.

 

Looking for more anti-inflammatory recipes? Check out our BlumKitchen Recipe Book. Our recipes are designed to reduce inflammation, support your thyroid, improve your liver’s detoxifciation function and heal your gut. Start cooking the Blum way today! Show Me Now

 

Meet Melissa: Melissa Rapoport is the Manager of Health Coaching and Lifestyle Programming at Blum Center for Health in Rye Brook, NY. She combines her graduate work in Developmental Psychology with her education in nutrition, health and coaching to create highly individualized programs that result in lifetime change. A contributing author to three international bestselling books, Melissa’s greatest joy is her relationship with her two daughters.

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Viruses and Autoimmunity

If you are a human, living and breathing on this planet, then you have already discovered that viruses are everywhere.  

Sometimes you get sick from them and sometimes you don’t. Have you ever wondered why?  

Some people can clear these viruses out of the body easily after their cold or flu, while in other’s the virus can persist and run amok causing problems like autoimmune disease. How does that happen?  

This issue is important whether or not you have an autoimmune condition because persisting, active viruses can cause ongoing symptoms like fatigue, too.  

Let me explain.  

We are all exposed to viruses.  

A healthy immune system should be able to respond to the infection and take care of business, clearing out the virus after a self-limited short illness. I think of a robust and well functioning immune system as the product of good “soil” within your body.  

Another name for the inner soil that grows your immune system is your terrain, which is part of a larger ecosystem that determines the functioning of, well, every system in your body..  (note the gardening metaphors).

If you have good inner terrain, you will “grow” normal functioning immune cells that can clear out the viruses. If you don’t, then they can persist. We believe there is a genetic predisposition that allows viruses to persist and trigger autoimmunity.  

But that’s not all that’s going on. Twin studies have shown us that two people with the same genetics and the same triggering virus, can have two completely different responses, all because of their terrain.

By the way, you can repair your immune system terrain with me LIVE beginning Tuesday, October 16th → The Immune Recovery Challenge Begins!

How do Viruses Trigger Autoimmunity?

When viruses linger in the body (again, most often because of terrain issues), it is called “chronic persistence.” This leads to an ongoing antiviral immune response, which can trigger autoimmunity in a few ways.

First, the chronic antiviral immune response at some point moves from being focused on the virus to targeting your own tissue. This can be because the immune response becomes less specific and it spreads to other tissues.

Second, autoimmunity happens because the virus is inside your cells or damaging them and your immune system appropriately is attacking the cells to get at the virus.

And finally, as the virus continues to spread its “proteins” around your body, there is mistaken identity as these proteins can look like your own tissue. We call this molecular mimicry.  

But you can see, no matter the mechanism, to prevent and treat autoimmunity that has been triggered by viruses, you want to make sure your immune terrain is functioning well so that the viruses are cleared out and not allowed to become chronic persisters.

Here is how to improve your terrain to create a robust and healthy immune system to clear out viruses:

  1. Nutrition:  
    1. Anti-inflammatory diet: whole foods rich in antioxidants, low in sugar, animal and processed fats;  elimination of foods that trigger inflammation including gluten and gmo foods. Less animal, more vegetable.
  2. Balanced hormones:  
    1. Stress system and adrenals are balanced and resilient
    2. Sex hormones:  good estrogen metabolism; adequate androgens to balance estrogens
  3. Healthy Gut:  
    1. Intestinal ecosystem:  adequate beneficial bacteria, good barrier function
    2. Digestion:  stomach acid, bile acids, pancreatic enzymes
  4. Well functioning liver:
    1. Maintain a low toxic load
    2. Clean up environment and make sure biotransformation pathways through liver are working well
    3. Support Estrogen detox pathways

Remember, you can’t avoid viruses! They are everywhere. Instead we work on creating resilience in the immune system so that the viruses don’t become chronic. To do this, we focus on the terrain of the immune system, which leads to the 4-step Immune System Recovery Plan, the focus of my first book on autoimmunity.

How You Can Repair Your Immune System with Me

I am teaching the Immune Recovery Challenge online beginning next week. It is the step-by-step companion to my book, The Immune System Recovery Plan. During the course, you will follow the 4-Step Immune System Recovery Plan together with me LIVE, using video and live coaching. It is a wonderful opportunity, and I hope you’ll join me!  

>>Yes, I Want to Repair My Immune System LIVE With Dr. Blum<<

If you haven’t read The Immune System Recovery Plan, you can find it HERE. In print around the world, it has transformed the lives of tens of thousands of people including my patients in my private practice.

 

References:  

Vieira et al.  Diet, microbiotia, and autoimmune diseases.  Lupus 2014 23: 518

Getts, D, et al.  Virus, infection, antiviral immunity, and autoimmunity.  Immunol Rev. 2013 September; 224 (1): 197-209.

Vanderlugt, C, and Miller, S.  Epitope spreading in immune-mediated diseases: implications for immunotherapy. Nature Reviews Immunology 2, 85–95 (1 February 2002)

 

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Autumn Apple Almond No-Guilt Muffins

Autumn is here! The transition from Summer fruits and vegetables to Fall produce may leave you thinking, “No more juicy peaches, no more heirloom tomatoes, what should I eat now?”

And for those who struggle with an autoimmune condition, like Hashimoto’s, Rheumatoid Arthritis or Sjogren’s you might be thinking, “What can I have that aligns with my autoimmune food plan?”

The great news is: Mother Nature gives you lots of options!

Look for fruits, like apples (so many different types to try!), blackberries and pears. And explore the autumn vegetables — all the varieties of squash, Brussels sprouts, cabbage, carrots, cauliflower, celery, kale, leeks, onions, parsnips, pumpkin, purple broccoli, spinach, sweet potatoes and turnips.

But for many people, some of these vegetables, even though they are healthy and considered anti-inflammatory, may leave you feeling bloated or uncomfortable. Perhaps, no matter what you eat, your symptoms flare.

If this speaks to you, consider joining Dr. Blum and me for our 8-week Immune Recovery Challengea step-by-step companion to Dr. Blum’s bestselling book, The Immune System Recovery Plan. During the course, you will follow the 4-Step Immune System Recovery Plan together with Dr. Blum, using video and live coaching with me. It is a wonderful opportunity to learn from Dr. Blum in a group setting and get all the support you need along the way. Join the Challenge

In the meantime, I want to share with you one of my favorite Blum Center for Health recipes:

Autumn Apple Almond No-Guilt Muffins

This recipe features whole foods and healthy low-impact ingredients to help keep autoimmune conditions at bay. No refined flour, sugar or butter. Unlike conventional flour muffins, these are filling too! Chia seeds serve double duty by providing helpful fatty acids that your body needs to fight inflammation, and by adding a crunchy and nutty texture to the top.

Use your favorite apple variety and then try others. You might even want to try these with pears and blackberries. Just know … any way you choose to make them, they’re delicious!

Here’s my personal favorite: I use tart Granny Smith or crunchy Gala apples. I love to eat one warm muffin out of the oven (just can’t resist!). And once they are cooled I’ve been know to cut one in half, lengthwise, place a wee bit of Ghee (clarified butter) in a skillet, put the halves facedown in the skillet to make them warm and slightly brown, and then (finishing touch!) spread with almond butter. Add a cup of hot tea and … hello Fall!

And here’s my special note: I’ve seen first-hand how Dr. Blum’s Immune System Recovery Plan changes lives. How do I know? I work with every single patient who walks through the doors of Blum Center for Health. Her 4-step plan works. And now, no matter where you are in the world, you can do it with us. If you suffer from an autoimmune condition … Do The Immune Recovery Challenge With Us

 

Autumn Apple Almond No-Guilt Muffins

Serves:  12 muffins

Serving size:  1 muffin

 

Ingredients:

Coconut oil

3 cups almond flour

1 ¼  teaspoons baking soda

1/2  teaspoon fine ground sea salt

2 ½  teaspoons ground cinnamon

1 tablespoon ground flax seeds

1/3 cup water

1 ½  teaspoon pure vanilla extract

¼ cup honey

1 cup fresh apples, unpeeled, cored/seeded, diced small

1 ½ tablespoons chia seeds, whole

 

Preparation:

  1. Preheat oven to 325F.     
  2. Lightly oil a 12-muffin pan with coconut oil  
  3. In a medium  bowl, combine the almond flour, baking soda, salt, cinnamon, and apples, and mix until well combined.
  4. In another medium bowl, combine the flax seeds, water, vanilla extract, and  honey and whisk together until well combined. Allow to sit for 5 minutes
  5. Slowly transfer the dry ingredients into the wet ingredients bowl. Stir until well combined.     
  6. Evenly distribute the muffin mix between the 12 muffin pan cups.
  7. Sprinkle the chia seeds evenly over the 12 muffin cups.     
  8. Place on the middle rack of the oven and bake for 21 minutes, rotating the pan halfway through.     
  9. Remove from the oven and allow to cool before taking out of the muffin pan.    

 

Meet Melissa: Melissa Rapoport is the Manager of Health Coaching and Lifestyle Programming at Blum Center for Health in Rye Brook, NY. She combines her graduate work in Developmental Psychology with her education in nutrition, health and coaching to create highly individualized programs that result in lifetime change. A contributing author to three international bestselling books, Melissa’s greatest joy is her relationship with her two daughters.

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5 Truths and 5 Myths about the Common Cold

Ready or not, cold and flu season is on its way!

Take this quiz with Blum Center for Health’s resident Integrative ENT, Dr Sezelle Gereau, and test your knowledge about the health of your nose and sinuses.

True or False:

  1. Allergies, colds and sinusitis are all manifestations of immune dysfunction.
  2. If you have a cold for more than 7 days, it’s a sinus infection.
  3. 3 sinus infections in a year, which last 1 month each, means you have chronic sinusitis.
  4. Green or brown nasal secretions means it’s time for antibiotics.
  5. True immune deficiencies are rare.
  6. Saline spray in a can or squeeze bottle is inferior to a neti pot.
  7. Food allergies can give you nasal symptoms.
  8. Taking Vitamin D on a regular basis can help prevent recurrent colds.
  9. Viruses cause most recurrent colds or sinus infections.
  10. Your gut is responsible for recurrent colds.

By the way, if you are constantly dealing with colds, flu, sinus infections or allergies, you’ll want to check out Dr. Blum’s new LIVE course, The Immune Recovery Challenge! It’s a group program specifically designed to help you heal your immune system. Check it out

Answers:

  1. Allergies, colds and sinusitis are all manifestations of immune dysfunction.

TRUE

Upper respiratory infections and sinusitis are not the only ways the body demonstrates that the immune system is not working well.  Allergies are in and of themselves a way that your body is telling you that something is awry with the immune system. One way to think about this is that instead of being “weak”, and not mounting enough of a response to pathogens, your immune system is “too strong” and fires to all the wrong triggers.  Techniques for getting the immune system in better balance work for all 3 issues.

  1. If you have a cold for more than 7 days, it’s a sinus infection.

FALSE

Colds usually resolve in seven to 10 days, but some can last for up to three weeks. The average duration of cough is 18 days¹, and in some cases, people develop a post-viral cough which can linger after the infection is gone.

  1. Three sinus infections in a year, which last 1 month each means you have chronic sinusitis.

FALSE

Chronic sinusitis is defined as chronic sinus infections that last 8 weeks or longer, and/or occur 4 or more times a year.² The Center for Disease Control actually advises patients to see their practitioner for symptoms that continue to worsen or do not improve within 10 days.

  1. Green or brown nasal secretions means it’s time for antibiotics.

FALSE

Hmmmmm….not necessarily!  But the following signs are common with sinusitis vs the common cold:

  • Headache
  • Stuffy or runny nose
  • Loss of the sense of smell
  • Facial pain or pressure, especially only on one side
  • Postnasal drip (mucus drips down the throat from the nose)
  • Sore throat
  • Fever
  • Coughing
  • Fatigue (being tired)
  • Bad breath

Remember, even if it is sinusitis, you might not require antibiotics.  In my office I often perform a nasal endoscopy and a nasal culture to help differentiate a simple cold from allergies or a sinus infection.  

  1.  True immune deficiencies are rare.

FALSE

Immune deficiencies are more common than previously thought – almost 1% of people have them.  If you are suspected of having an immune deficiency, and referred to a specialist for a work up, your chances of having one are more than 64%. ³ But for many doctors, it’s much easier to give you yet another prescription for antibiotics for your sinus infection than to take a hard, long look at what might be causing the issue in the first place.

  1. Saline spray in a can or squeeze bottle is inferior to a Neti pot

FALSE

Patients should use whichever method of delivery they prefer.  There’s lots of data to show that nasal washing is important to shorten the course of a cold or sinus infection.

  1. Food allergies can give you nasal symptoms.

TRUE

Food allergies and sensitivities can sometimes cause nasal congestion and post nasal drip. But more commonly those symptoms come from environmental allergies.  Furthermore, less than 10% of the general population have food allergies, but up to 40% of the general population have environmental allergies – dust being the most common.  So, start first with allergy testing for things in the environment – then discuss with your doctor if foods might be causing the issue.

  1. Taking Vitamin D on a regular basis can help prevent recurrent colds.

TRUE

Even if your Vitamin D levels are in the low normal range, they might not be high enough to help ward off infections.  For anyone who is experiencing recurrent infections, I recommend supplementation with Vitamin D in the winter months. Taking Vitamin K2 along with this can help with the absorption of the Vitamin D.

  1.  Viruses cause most recurrent colds or sinus infections.

TRUE

Nine out of 10 cases of sinusitis and upper respiratory infection in adults and 5/7 cases in children are caused by viruses.² So antibiotics won’t work.  What does work are techniques such as good hand washing, staying home when sick and keeping your immune system at its best with proper diet and supplements.

      10.Your gut is responsible for recurrent colds.  

TRUE

The vast majority of the immune system lies in the gut. So, directly or  indirectly it plays a key role in all immune issues. Nearly everyone who struggles with recurrent colds has a gut microbiome that is out of balance. A leaky gut, also called increased intestinal permeability, is associated with chronic illness,, and research has made it clear that to repair the immune system and reduce inflammation, you must heal the leaky gut. We repair the gut through food, proven, scientifically-supported antimicrobial supplements and building resilience to life’s stressors.

How We Can Help You Improve Your Immune System

“Do It With Us” with Dr. Blum! Yes, that’s right! Dr. Blum’s new LIVE course, The Immune Recovery Challenge is open! The Immune Recovery Challenge is the step-by-step companion to Dr. Blum’s bestselling book, The Immune System Recovery Plan. During the course, you will follow the 4-Step Immune System Recovery Plan together with Dr. Blum, using video and live coaching. It’s devoted to your HEALTH TRANSFORMATION! Get the Info

If you want personal one-to-one treatment, come to Blum Center for Health. People travel from around the world to meet with our practitioners. You’ll meet with your practitioner for an hour and a half, meet with our Functional Medicine Nutritionist, and receive your first treatment plan. Get More Info

 

Meet Dr. Gereau: Sezelle Gereau, MD, is an integrative ENT/Allergist with more than 20 years of experience. She uses an integrative and functional medicine approach to conditions such as allergies, chronic sinusitis, sleep apnea and headaches. She is one of the few physicians in the New York City metro area certified to prescribe sublingual immunotherapy drops (SLIT) instead of allergy shots.

 

Resources:
  1. Ebell, M. H.; Lundgren, J.; Youngpairoj, S. (Jan–Feb 2013). “How long does a cough last? Comparing patients’ expectations with data from a systematic review of the literature”. Annals of Family Medicine. 11 (1): 5–13.
  2. https://www.cdc.gov/antibiotic-use/community/for-patients/common-illnesses/sinus-infection.html
  3. https://www.amjmed.com/article/S0002-9343(12)00274-4/pdf